Agriculture in Putti Village

Putti Village dreams of larger scale farming

 

Putti Village AgriculturePeriodic draughts and famines are a constant challenge in Africa.
For that reason, the people of Putti Village have a dream to make their food production more efficient.  In order to achieve that, they are striving to gradually change from small scale to larger scale farming. The progress they have made in recent years is already helping the community to fight poverty. But more needs to be done, to insure the community’s food supply. 

Putti Village AgricultureThe agricultural activities, as they take place right now, involve both men and women from all ranks of the village. The community typically divides the land in smaller units and applies crop rotation and mixed farming to prevent depletion of the soil. As the community wants their products to be organic, they do not use fertilizers and since their land is so fertile, this has not posed any difficulties as of yet. Even with the growing need for production, the community has still been able to resist the temptation to use fertilizers.

While still ploughing the land using bulls that are rented from their Christian neighbors, members of the Putti community dream of owning a tractor that will not only be used to cultivate their own land, but can also help them make money, as they will be able to rent it out to neighboring farmers. In addition, if each family gets a dairy cow or some poultry for their household income, this will also be a way of fighting poverty in the Putti community.

“Our dream is to evolve from subsistence farming to commercial agriculture, that is to say, farming on a larger plot of land, planting both food crops and cash crops, using more efficient farming technology, and rearing animals for milk and birds for meat to be sold”

Feeding the village

Putti Village AgricultureThe most commonly planted crops include the following:

  • Maize
  • Beans
  • Soya beans
  • Rice
  • Cassava
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Watermelon
  • Banana
  • Carrots
  • Onions
  •  Tomatoes

Putti Village AgricultureThe planting of crops takes place twice a year; in March and in September. The harvesting takes place in July and in December. Since the ability to water the crops is solely dependent on the weather (i.e. rain water), every harvest turns out differently.  The exact timing of the harvest depends largely on the type of crops that are planted.  Some crops (e.g. maize and beans) take three to four months to mature.  Other crops (such as cassava and millet) take more than six months before they can be harvested.  After the crops are gathered, the food is first dried and then stored locally in polythene bags, or at times in people’s houses.  Again, in efforts to keep the food supply organic and healthy, the villagers of Putti do not use pesticides to protect them.

Running the Project

There is not just one person in charge of the community’s agricultural efforts.  Board members and community members alike volunteer to make this project come alive. Our hope is that recent graduates will take the lead as they have experience with computers, internet access, and analytical skills. We are looking forward for this project to evolve more efficiency and to a larger scale.

You can help!

We greatly welcome donations for seeds, fruit trees, and farming equipment for our agricultural projects.  If you are able to send us a donation (or even make a monthly commitment, no matter how modest it would be) you will not only be feeding the people of Putti right now, you will be investing into the future of the village’s ability to become self-sufficient.  

Click the link below to plant your life giving tree in the agricultural community of Putti Village. Thank you!


In October, Puttis worked hard to prepare the land for harvesting.

Feeding the village

Putti Children of Putti VillageThe people of Putti decided to plant maize and soya this last October, as these contribute to a major part of the African diet. In years gone by, before Putti had land of their own, they just had to hope that somehow food would arrive, it didn’t. Meaning that every year they suffered from famine. Sometimes, so bad that adults would only have enough to enable them to eat one meal a day, on alternate days, children were restricted  to small portions of whatever was around, causing severe malnutrition.

 Now thankfully, that is something we pray will not happen again. Putti-Village-Agriculture_MaizeYes, there is still a shortage of food but with maize and soya  crops growing well,  no-one should go hungry. The crops will be harvested in February, then stored and distributed to the most needy during lean times.

The next Food Project is on it’s way, the Putti land is fertile but until money is raised to buy more seeds the harvest is relatively small. Please donate just $10 or whatever you can, which will ultimately feed a child during their most needy times.”

Thank you so much for your interest and kindness.

Ros -PVAO

Please help us by donating to this cause. Click the donate button to make a donation with paypal.


Once the Maize is Harvested

Putti-Village-Agriculture_Maize3After harvest, the maize is poured on the clean and dry court yard or compound in hot sunshine for it to dry for 3 to 4 days, depending on the good weather. If poor weather is being experienced, it may take more than 4 days for maize to dry. After drying, it is taken directly to grinding mill machine. It costs 6 cents per kilo (2.2lbs) to grind maize to make flour.

Making Posho with the Maize

Making Posho5 maga/ cups of water from any water source are measured into a saucepan, the saucepan is then put into the local stones (stove) already on fire, and the water is boiled up to 95 degrees. 1 kg of maize floor is poured into 5 cups of boiled water stir it with megling sticking,  in few seconds it will turn into porridge, eventually turning into solid form. when it turns into poshosoild, cook it with less fire for 10 minutes, eventually the food known as Posho will ready. When it is ready, put solid Posho On plate and start serving like a person would serve bread, cutting with knife or plate (it is very soft when hot), and served warm.

1kg of maize flour serves 3.

Recipe For Say

Measure any amount in the cup and fry it in the saucepan directly without any ingredients. Leave it to cool for a few minutes then put in the motor or machine mill, or pound by hand. Mix the milled powder with cold or warm water and cook for  15 to 25 minutes. Mix in some salt, then if desired, you can stir in tomatoes and onions. After 15 to 25 minutes the source is ready to eat, serve using handful spoon on plates.